Italian Cars
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo A3/C Corsa
The Corsa was specially made by Giotto Bizzarrini. He continued to develop the A3/C throughout its life, achieving speeds of 190 mph with the car. The results were spectacular, with performance and reliability in a classic body. In 1964 it captured first in its class at Le Mans against such cars as the Ford GT40 and Shelby Cobra.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo P538
Giotto Bizzarini’s passion was to build race cars and win at Le Mans. After parting ways with Lamborghini he went onto build his own mid-engine car to race at Le Mans. The P538 epitomized Italian styling with thoroughbred performance.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned 5300 GT Spyder
Bizzarrini produced his Spyder in an extremely limited quantity - only 3 original Spyder’s were produced. There are simply too few to satisfy the world’s sports car enthusiasts.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned 5300 GT Strada
The Grifo Strada originally debuted at the 1963 Turin Auto Show and it was the talk of the show. The last car was built in 1968. Cars built under the Giotto Bizzarrini’s own name could best be described as the closest thing to taking a race car and putting it on the street.
 
 
 
Ferrari 212 Barchetta
The 166, 195 and 212 Inters were Ferrari’s first road cars. The real successor to these cars was the 250 GT, which ultimately established Ferrari as a road car manufacturer.
 
 
 
Ferrari 340MM
Only five original 340MM cars were bodied by Vignale - too few to satisfy the world's sports racing car enthusiasts. This car design was successful from the start, winning the 1953 Mille Miglia and the Daily Express race at Silverstone. These limited edition cars will be recreated with a hand-crafted body and chassis by local Italian artisans with personal certification from Sig. Alfredo Vignale.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 375 America
Only three original coupes were built by Carrozzeria Vignale along with one cabriolet. These cars have withstood the test of time. The Vignale 375 remains a timeless design - as current today as in 1953. The limited edition Vignale 375 America will be hand-crafted by local artisans in Italy under the watchful eye of the designer Sig. Vignale.
 
   
 
Ferrari 375 MM Scaglietti Coupe
Pinin Farina supplied most of the bodies for the 26 375 MMs. The Spyder and Berlinetta bodies were the most common. Only Five 375 MMs were constructed and fitted with custom coachwork especially for Ferrari's wealthiest customers and European royalty.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 GT Zagato
Ferrari and Zagato formed one of the most desirable 'marriages' in car design to produce the 250 GT Zagato (GTZ). It was their most successful collaboration and only five were ever made for clients. As the ultimate combination, the GTZ allied the already proven Ferrari 250 Tour de France chassis with Zagato's curvaceous low drag body. It guaranteed success.
 
 
 
Ferrari 410 S
The 410 S was among the most powerful sports racing cars built in the 1950's, carrying a 4.9 liter Lampredi long-block V12 engine of nearly 400 horsepower with even more torque of 410 foot-pounds.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 500 Mondial Testa Rossa
Ferrari introduced the new 500 Testa Rossa, so named because the cam covers were painted red. The 500 TR was extremely competitive in both Europe and the States with 17 examples being completed.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France
No two 250 GT Berlinettas were the same. While dominating the Tour de France, the 250 TdF went on to class victories at the Mille Migla and many other Italian events. In its day, this car was the racer of choice.
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
In the early sixties, Ferrari won Le Mans three consecutive years with the front-engine Testa Rossa. The last of these victories marked the end of an important era for Ferrari and sports car racing.
 
 
   
 
Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta
Considered by many as Ferrari's and Pininfarina's best looking car, the SWB took the first four places in its class at the 1960 Le Mans. Form and function can be combined very well in automotive design and the Ferrari 250 GT SWB underlines this like few others do.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder
The California Spyder was a car to get excited about. It had the same 140 mph performance and the same competition chassis as the Ferrari's lapping the race tracks. These Spyder Competizione cars did well in the GT class and tied all California Spyders to a sporting pedigree. Today these cars are the most prized Ferrari's on the road.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 330 TRI/LM Testa Rossa
The 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM was the only 4-litre Testa Rossa built. It also is the last Testa Rossa and the last front-engined sports racing car built by Ferrari.
 
 


Ferrari 250 GTO Prototype 0523GT
In 1961 Enzo personally directed Bizzarrini to build a new competition Berlinetta to win Le Mans. On August 11th, within 2 months of starting the project, perhaps the most famous prototype race car of all time rolled onto test track...so the 250 GTO legend was born. In November, due to the growing internal tensions, Giotto Bizzarrini did no more work on the car. And so as work began on the factory production versions, 0523GT was dismantled, destroyed, and lost forever. Today, Bizzarrini has agreed to bring his car back to life and sanction an exact recreation of the lost Prototype # 0523GT. The construction will be overseen and certified by Giotto Bizzarrini.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 GTO Gran Turismo Omologato
The best car in the world. While more modern supercars surpass the GTO in terms of performance, none excel better in both form and function. During its heyday, the GTO dominated the World Sportscar Championship, and it is still one of the most beautiful shapes ever to grace a Ferrari chassis.
 
 
 
Pininfarina GTO Coupe Aerodinamico
For the 1964 season a completely new car was developed to race in the GT class, resulting from the 1963 Le Mans winning 250 P. Being mid-engined, this new 250 LM shared no road going counterpart and therefore its homologation was refused by the FIA. Ferrari hastily assembled three new 'Series 2' GTOs, fitted with a Pininfarina styled body.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 330 GTO
Ferrari built three GTO’s with the four-litre 330 engine sometimes called the "330 GTO" - recognizable by the large hump on the hood.
 
 
 
Ferrari 330 LMB
330 LMBs are essentially a development of the 250 GTOs and fitted with the 4-litre 330 engine. Although visually similar to the 250 GTOs, there are numerous body differences. These unique cars are highly valued on today's market place and have proven themselves to be very successful in historic racing.
 
 
 
Ferrari 250LM
The 250LM made its debut at the 1963 Paris Motorshow. With only 32 built, the 250LM is extremely rare and valuable. The 250LM secured Ferrari's last overall Le Mans victory and to this day it has a special spot in many Ferrari fans' hearts.
 
 
 
Ferrari 206SP
February 1966 Ferrari introduced the 206SP to the press at Maranello. Only three 206SP coupes were completed of which two coupes ran in the 1966 Le Mans as a Maranello Consessionaire entry.
 
 

 
Ferrari 250 GT Nembo Spyder
Certified by Bizzarrini

Of all the Ferrari's made by Neri and Bonacini, the small series of Nembo Spyders was their greatest. From a small shop in Modena, they transformed 250 GT Ferrari chassis into something much more special. Giotto Bizzarrini was a regular visitor to the workshop, providing valued input on the firm's cars. Luigi Chinetti saw the car and it is thought that this inspired the creation of the 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione Speciale
This very limited series of 3 Ferrari racing GT cars have often been referred to as the 1965 250 GTO and is “the car” to have for any historic racing event, and the ultimate Ferrari GT racing car addition to any historic race team or Ferrari collection.
 
 
 
Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder
As if the car's provenance weren't enough, the build specifications of Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder should make any enthusiast salivate. Just two were built with an alloy body designed by acknowledged masters - Pininfarina and Scaglietti.
 
 
 
Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Daytona Prototype
Scaglietti built two Daytona prototypes. However, only one featured the unique 275 nose but was completely new from the windshield back. This car was constructed in 1967 and represents the transition between the last two great front-engined V12 road/track cars that Ferrari constructed.
 
 
 
Ferrari 330P4
One of the most revered Ferraris is the 330P4. It immediately draws attention with curvaceously low lines and a sleek, yet aggressive demeanor. Interestingly, the P4 is also one of the last Ferrari prototypes that still resembles a sports car. And since only one completely original car remains, it's an elusive sight for many fans.
 
 
 
Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Competizione
Durable and powerful, racing Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Competizione cars continued through the 1970s. At Le Mans, they were sixth overall in 1973 and fifth and sixth overall in 1974. In 1979, five years after production had stopped, at the 24 Hours of Daytona, the car achieved a first in the GTO class and a remarkable second overall. Only 15 factory “competizione” cars were made, thrilling their drivers and winning races long after the production had finished.
 
 
 
 
Maserati A6 GCS/53 Pinin Farina Berlinetta
In 1953 Maserati produced a revised version of their 2 litre A6 sportscar, the A6 GCS/53, this Pinin Farina Berlinetta remains as one of the best looking GTs ever and the best looking Maserati ever produced.
 
 
 
Maserati A6G/54 2000 Frua Spider
One of the most successful coachbuilders on the A6 chassis was Pietro Frua and his most memorable and successful design was the Spyder. These cars are coveted by collectors for their excellent build quality and tasteful yet sporting styling.
 
 
 
Maserati A6G/54 2000 Zagato Coupe
Zagato provided numerous coupe bodies for the twin-cam A6G, but surprisingly only one of these (s/n 2121) sported the company's trademark double-bubble roof.
 
 
 
Maserati 250F
The Maserati 250F was built between 1954 and 1957, 26 examples of which were completed by the factory. Fangio's most notable drive was his amazing Nurburgring victory. The best balanced of all front engined Grand Prix racers, the 250F perfectly suited Fangio's high speed four wheel drifts.
 
 
 
Maserati 450S
Most of 450S's went to the United States where they were raced with some success. Two were fitted with enlarged 5.7 litre engines, pumping out an incredible 526 bhp. In awe of its power, Carol Shelby nick-named his 450S, 'Big Hawg'. The 450S probably was the fastest Maserati sports car ever made.
 
 
 
Maserati Birdcage Tipo 60/61
The Maserati birdcage Tipo 60/61 is arguably one of the greatest cars of all time. Giulio Alfieri’s bold chassis design added a new dimension to the design of race cars for years to come.
 
 
 
 
Vignale 340MM Barchetta
Only five original 340MM cars were bodied by Vignale - too few to satisfy the world's sports racing car enthusiasts. This car design was successful from the start, winning the 1953 Mille Miglia and the Daily Express race at Silverstone. These limited edition cars will be recreated with a hand-crafted body and chassis by local Italian artisans with personal certification from Sig. Alfredo Vignale.
 
 
 
 
Vignale 375 America
Only three original coupes were built by Carrozzeria Vignale along with one cabriolet. These cars have withstood the test of time. The Vignale 375 remains a timeless design - as current today as in 1953. The limited edition Vignale 375 America will be hand-crafted by local artisans in Italy under the watchful eye of the designer Sig. Vignale.
 
British Cars
   
 
Aston Martin DB3S
The DB3S introduced many welcomed changes over the DB3. DB3S's helped Aston Martin establish many international victories. It paved the way for David Brown’s later victories in the DBR1 and 2 series.
 
 
   
 
Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Touring Spyder
Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera of Milan designed and manufactured only three hand-crafted Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Touring Spyders. The first car was debuted at the 1956 Paris Automobile Show.
 
 
 
Aston Martin DBR1
Ten years after David Brown bought Aston Martin, he would finally achieve his racing ambitions and win the 24-Hours of Le Mans in a DBR1/2. The DBR1/2 has now become the most valuable Aston Martin.
 
 
 
 
Aston Martin DBR2
DBR2 began competition at the 1957 24 Hours of Le Mans. In 1958, the DBR2's were upgraded to newer 3.9 litre engines. DBR2’s won both the Sussex Trophy at Goodwood and the British Empire Trophy at Oulton Park, driven by Stirling Moss in both wins. Both DBR2s were upgraded to the 4.2 liter engines and transferred to America where they could compete easier with larger engine capacities.
 
 
 
 
Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
Only 19 Zagato DB4 GT race cars were built to compete against the Ferrari 250 SWB Berlinetta Coupes in international competition. Today the DB4 GT Zagato is considered to be one of the most desirable of all collectable cars for its rarity, beauty, and its speed.
 
 
 
Aston Martin DP212
Reluctant to give up the fight with Ferrari, Aston Martin developed a new version of the DB4 GT to run under the new four litre prototype rules of 1962. Dubbed the DP212, this new car was the first of four 'project cars' produced by Aston. The DP212 used a low profile nose, sweeping body and rear Kamm tail to good effect.
 
 
 
 
Aston Martin DP214
The DP214 was much lower and wider than its predecessor for increased stability and high speed racing. These changes allowed the 317 bhp car to achieve 186 mph down the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans. One car remains.
 
   
 

 
Norman Dewis D-Type
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

With three Le Mans wins, the Jaguar D-Type remains as one of the most successful racing cars ever. The Norman Dewis’ story at Jaguar is both of personal achievement and unique involvement in a heroic period of great cars in Jaguar’s history. In a career spanning 33 years at Jaguar, Norman Dewis tested and developed a remarkable series of cars including: the C-Type, D-Type, and XJ13, as well as driving the “works” D-Type in the 1955 Le Mans. This special sanctioned edition will produce five short-nose cars and five “works” long-nose cars. Cars will be constructed to factory period specifications.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Norman Dewis XJ13
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

Built to contend Le Mans, the XJ13 is a story of a competition car initially prepared to take on Ford and Ferrari, but it never competed in a race. The XJ13's design used all the hallmarks of the 1960's successful race cars. This included a V12 engine in a mid-mounted position, both of which were very new to Jaguar.
 
 
 

 
 
Norman Dewis 55th Anniversary XKSS
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

This special sanctioned 55th Anniversary Norman Dewis XKSS will have a production run of five XKSS cars. These cars will be constructed to factory specifications. Fine Sports Cars will begin taking orders for the ten Norman Dewis Santioned D-Type Jaguars in 2012.

The XKSS is recognized today one of the rarest and most sought after sports cars from the 1950’s. Here was a thinly disguised, road-legal race car - a road-going version of the three-times Le Mans-winning Jaguar D-Type. A total of only 16 XKSS cars were made.
 

 
 
 
 
 
Lister-Jaguar
After the Lister car’s 1957 race heroics, customers flocked to Cambridge including America's Briggs Cunningham. For 1958 Lister produced the immortal 'Knobbly'. The partnership of Carroll Shelby and Jim Hall would later fit Chevrolet V8 engines in these Lister cars with great success.
 
 
 
German Cars
 
 
Porsche 917K
The 917K's success around the world is renowned. Many consider it the greatest race car of all time. The factory 917K won the 24 Hour Le Mans, 12 Hours of Sebring, and Daytona 24 hour sports car championship.
 
 
Spanish Cars
 
 
 
Pegaso Z102
In the early 1950’s, the most advanced and fastest road car was built not in Italy, Germany or England but in Spain. This 'supercar' was the brainchild of former Alfa Romeo designer Wilfredo Ricart and built by ENASA in the remnants of the Hispano Suiza factory. Ricart got it absolutely right when they launched the Pegaso Z102 at the 1951 Paris Auto Salon, with a car that weighed less than 1000 kg and had a top speed of 140 mph and 0-60 mph in 8.5 seconds.
   
Jaguar
 

 
Norman Dewis D-Type
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

With three Le Mans wins, the Jaguar D-Type remains as one of the most successful racing cars ever. The Norman Dewis’ story at Jaguar is both of personal achievement and unique involvement in a heroic period of great cars in Jaguar’s history. In a career spanning 33 years at Jaguar, Norman Dewis tested and developed a remarkable series of cars including: the C-Type, D-Type, and XJ13, as well as driving the “works” D-Type in the 1955 Le Mans. This special sanctioned edition will produce five short-nose cars and five “works” long-nose cars. Cars will be constructed to factory period specifications.
Additional Jaguar Models
 
 
 
 
 
 
Norman Dewis XJ13
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

Built to contend Le Mans, the XJ13 is a story of a competition car initially prepared to take on Ford and Ferrari, but it never competed in a race. The XJ13's design used all the hallmarks of the 1960's successful race cars. This included a V12 engine in a mid-mounted position, both of which were very new to Jaguar.
 
 
 

 
Norman Dewis 55th Anniversary XKSS
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

This special sanctioned 55th Anniversary Norman Dewis XKSS will have a production run of five XKSS cars. These cars will be constructed to factory specifications. Fine Sports Cars will begin taking orders for the ten Norman Dewis Santioned D-Type Jaguars in 2012.

The XKSS is recognized today one of the rarest and most sought after sports cars from the 1950’s. Here was a thinly disguised, road-legal race car - a road-going version of the three-times Le Mans-winning Jaguar D-Type. A total of only 16 XKSS cars were made.
 

 
 
 
Bizzarrini
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo A3/C Corsa
The Corsa was specially made by Giotto Bizzarrini. He continued to develop the A3/C throughout its life, achieving speeds of 190 mph with the car. The results were spectacular, with performance and reliability in a classic body. In 1964 it captured first in its class at Le Mans against such cars as the Ford GT40 and Shelby Cobra.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo P538
Giotto Bizzarini’s passion was to build race cars and win at Le Mans. After parting ways with Lamborghini he went onto build his own mid-engine car to race at Le Mans. The P538 epitomized Italian styling with thoroughbred performance.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned 5300 GT Spyder
Bizzarrini produced his Spyder in an extremely limited quantity - only 3 original Spyder’s were produced. There are simply too few to satisfy the world’s sports car enthusiasts.
 
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned 5300 GT Strada
The Grifo Strada originally debuted at the 1963 Turin Auto Show and it was the talk of the show. The last car was built in 1968. Cars built under the Giotto Bizzarrini’s own name could best be described as the closest thing to taking a race car and putting it on the street.
 
 
Ferrari
 


Bizzarrini Sanctioned 250 GTO Prototype
In 1961 Enzo personally directed Bizzarrini to build a new competition Berlinetta to win Le Mans. On August 11th, within 2 months of starting the project, perhaps the most famous prototype race car of all time rolled onto test track...so the 250 GTO legend was born. In November, due to the growing internal tensions, Giotto Bizzarrini did no more work on the car. And so as work began on the factory production versions, 0523GT was dismantled, destroyed, and lost forever. Today, Bizzarrini has agreed to bring his car back to life and sanction an exact recreation of the lost Prototype # 0523GT. The construction will be overseen and certified by Giotto Bizzarrini.
 
 

 
Ferrari 250 GT Nembo Spyder
Certified by Bizzarrini

Of all the Ferrari's made by Neri and Bonacini, the small series of Nembo Spyders was their greatest. From a small shop in Modena, they transformed 250 GT Ferrari chassis into something much more special. Giotto Bizzarrini was a regular visitor to the workshop, providing valued input on the firm's cars. Luigi Chinetti saw the car and it is thought that this inspired the creation of the 275 GTB/4 NART Spyder.
 
 
Vignale
 
 
 
Vignale Sanctioned 340MM Barchetta
Only five original 340MM cars were bodied by Vignale - too few to satisfy the world's sports racing car enthusiasts. This car design was successful from the start, winning the 1953 Mille Miglia and the Daily Express race at Silverstone. These limited edition cars will be recreated with a hand-crafted body and chassis by local Italian artisans with personal certification from Sig. Alfredo Vignale.
 
 
 
 
Vignale Sanctioned 375 America
Only three original coupes were built by Carrozzeria Vignale along with one cabriolet. These cars have withstood the test of time. The Vignale 375 remains a timeless design - as current today as in 1953. The limited edition Vignale 375 America will be hand-crafted by local artisans in Italy under the watchful eye of the designer Sig. Vignale.
 
 
 
 
 
Aston Martin DP212
Reluctant to give up the fight with Ferrari, Aston Martin developed a new version of the DB4 GT to run under the new four litre prototype rules of 1962. Dubbed the DP212, this new car was the first of four 'project cars' produced by Aston. The DP212 used a low profile nose, sweeping body and rear Kamm tail to good effect.
 
 
 
 
Aston Martin DP214
The DP214 was much lower and wider than its predecessor for increased stability and high speed racing. These changes allowed the 317 bhp car to achieve 186 mph down the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans. One car remains.
 
   
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo A3/C Corsa
The Corsa was specially made by Giotto Bizzarrini. He continued to develop the A3/C throughout its life, achieving speeds of 190 mph with the car. The results were spectacular, with performance and reliability in a classic body. In 1964 it captured first in its class at Le Mans against such cars as the Ford GT40 and Shelby Cobra.
 
 
 
Bizzarrini Sanctioned Grifo P538
Giotto Bizzarini’s passion was to build race cars and win at Le Mans. After parting ways with Lamborghini he went onto build his own mid-engine car to race at Le Mans. The P538 epitomized Italian styling with thoroughbred performance.
 
   
 
 
Ferrari 330 TRI/LM Testa Rossa
The 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM was the only 4-litre Testa Rossa built. It also is the last Testa Rossa and the last front-engined sports racing car built by Ferrari.
 
 


Ferrari 250 GTO Prototype 0523GT
In 1961 Enzo personally directed Bizzarrini to build a new competition Berlinetta to win Le Mans. On August 11th, within 2 months of starting the project, perhaps the most famous prototype race car of all time rolled onto test track...so the 250 GTO legend was born. In November, due to the growing internal tensions, Giotto Bizzarrini did no more work on the car. And so as work began on the factory production versions, 0523GT was dismantled, destroyed, and lost forever. Today, Bizzarrini has agreed to bring his car back to life and sanction an exact recreation of the lost Prototype # 0523GT. The construction will be overseen and certified by Giotto Bizzarrini.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 250 GTO Gran Turismo Omologato
The best car in the world. While more modern supercars surpass the GTO in terms of performance, none excel better in both form and function. During its heyday, the GTO dominated the World Sportscar Championship, and it is still one of the most beautiful shapes ever to grace a Ferrari chassis.
 
 
 
 
Ferrari 330 GTO
Ferrari built three GTO’s with the four-litre 330 engine sometimes called the "330 GTO" - recognizable by the large hump on the hood.
 
 
 
Ferrari 330 LMB
330 LMBs are essentially a development of the 250 GTOs and fitted with the 4-litre 330 engine. Although visually similar to the 250 GTOs, there are numerous body differences. These unique cars are highly valued on today's market place and have proven themselves to be very successful in historic racing.
 
 
 
Ferrari 250LM
The 250LM made its debut at the 1963 Paris Motorshow. With only 32 built, the 250LM is extremely rare and valuable. The 250LM secured Ferrari's last overall Le Mans victory and to this day it has a special spot in many Ferrari fans' hearts.
 
 
 
Ferrari 206SP
February 1966 Ferrari introduced the 206SP to the press at Maranello. Only three 206SP coupes were completed of which two coupes ran in the 1966 Le Mans as a Maranello Consessionaire entry.
 
 
 
Ferrari 330P4
One of the most revered Ferraris is the 330P4. It immediately draws attention with curvaceously low lines and a sleek, yet aggressive demeanor. Interestingly, the P4 is also one of the last Ferrari prototypes that still resembles a sports car. And since only one completely original car remains, it's an elusive sight for many fans.
 
 
 
 
 
Norman Dewis XJ13
Sanctioned by Norman Dewis

Built to contend Le Mans, the XJ13 is a story of a competition car initially prepared to take on Ford and Ferrari, but it never competed in a race. The XJ13's design used all the hallmarks of the 1960's successful race cars. This included a V12 engine in a mid-mounted position, both of which were very new to Jaguar.
 
 
 
 
McLaren 8F (Can-Am)
The McLaren was refined in 1971 with the fins now starting at the tip of the front fenders of the M8F. The all aluminium V8 was further increased in size, displacing well over 8 litres. This hiked the power to 740 bhp, which made the M8F the first Can-Am to break the 1000 bhp/ton. Having won 37 races in five seasons, McLaren's domination came to an abrupt end in 1972 courtesy of the Turbo-charged Porsche 917's.
 
 
 
Porsche 917K
The 917K's success around the world is renowned. Many consider it the greatest race car of all time. The factory 917K won the 24 Hour Le Mans, 12 Hours of Sebring, and Daytona 24 hour sports car championship.
 
 
 
 
Click here to see some examples of our fine sports racing cars that we have built on special order for our clients: Alfa Romeo 2900B, Bugatti Type 35B, Ford GT40, McLaren 8F (Can-Am), Mercedes Benz 300SLR Sports Racer, Porsche 917K, Watson Indy Roadster.

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